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Frederick Douglass

Learns to read and write, although forbidden


Douglass moves to Baltimore to live as a houseboy with Hugh and Sophia Auld, relatives of his master. Sophia teaches him the alphabet. When Hugh forbids her to continue her instruction, because it is unlawful to teach slaves how to read, Douglass makes the neighborhood boy’s his teachers, by giving away his food in exchange for lessons in reading and writing.

I lived in Master Hugh’s family about seven years. During this time, I succeeded in learning to read and write. In accomplishing this, I was compelled to resort to various stratagems. I had no regular teacher. My mistress, who had kindly commenced to instruct me, had, in compliance with the advice and direction of her husband, not only ceased to instruct, but had set her face against my being instructed by any one else. She finally became even more violent in her opposition than her husband himself.

The plan which I adopted, and the one by which I was most successful, was that of making friends of all the little white boys whom I met in the street. As many of these as I could, I converted into teachers. With their kindly aid, obtained at different times and in different places, I finally succeeded in learning to read. When I was sent of errands, I always took my book with me, and by going one part of my errand quickly, I found time to get a lesson before my return. I used also to carry bread with me, enough of which was always in the house, and to which I was always welcome; for I was much better off in this regard than many of the poor white children in our neighborhood. This bread I used to bestow upon the hungry little urchins, who, in return, would give me that more valuable bread of knowledge.