Ebola

Ebola466 posts

Ebola is a disease caused by an ebolavirus. Symptoms start two days to three weeks after contracting the virus, with a fever, sore throat, muscle pain and headaches. Vomiting, diarrhea and rash follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys. Victims bleed both within the body and externally. From 1976 through 2013, the World Health Organization reported a total of 1,716 cases. In 2013 an outbreak started in Guinea, spreading to neighboring African countries and infectied doctors, some of who were transported back to the US for treatment. The virus continues to claim victims as it spreads to more countries.

23 Feb, 2016

Back in hospital

HospitalIllness

Cafferkey returns to hospital for a third time after contracting the virus initially two years ago. She is being treated at Glasgow’s Queen Elizabeth University hospital. NHS spokesperson:

Under routine monitoring by the Infectious Diseases Unit, Pauline Cafferkey has been admitted to hospital for further investigations.

9 Oct, 2015

Admitted to hospital

Hospital

After falling ill in Glasgow, Cafferkey is flown to London by military aircraft and admitted to the specialist treatment isolation unit at Royal Free Hospital in London.

We can confirm that Pauline Cafferkey was transferred from the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow to the Royal Free London hospital in the early hours of this morning due to an unusual late complication of her previous infection by the Ebola virus. She will now be treated in isolation in the hospital’s high-level isolation unit under nationally agreed guidelines. The Ebola virus can only be transmitted by direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected person while they are symptomatic, so the risk to the general public remains low.

4 Jan, 2015

Health worker evaluated

Hospital

An American health worker, possibly exposed to Ebola in Sierra Leone, enters the University of Nebraska Medical Center for evaluation and testing. Taylor Wilson, hospital spokesman:

There will be 21 days of monitoring and if the disease does develop, obviously treatment would begin pretty quickly.

Do you love news? Help us add and summarize the world's news. Find out more