Freddie Gray

Freddie Gray27 posts

Freddie Gray was a Baltimore resident who was arrested on April 12, 2015. During his journey to the station in a police van Gray was found unresponsive. He was taken to hospital and died on April 19. His death sparked riots in Baltimore and Chicago and protests across the United States. Six police officers involved in his arrest have been charged with multiple counts, including manslaughter, homicide, and misconduct.

8 May, 2015

Dismissal filing cites conflict of interest

Files Suit

Attorneys for the six Baltimore police officers charged in Gray’s death file a motion to have the case dismissed or have Marilyn Mosby’s office taken off the case. The motion lists what attorneys say are numerous conflicts of interest and concerns about the investigation. The filing says Marilyn Mosby’s husband, City Councilman Nick Mosby, represents the West Baltimore district where Gray was arrested, and that one of her chief prosecutors is in a relationship with a local television reporter who interviewed the prisoner who was in the police van with Gray on April 12. The filing also says Marilyn Mosby has a close professional and personal relationship with Murphy, the Gray family’s lawyer and unofficial spokesman. Filing:

Mrs. Mosby’s connection to Mr. Murphy is of great concern to the undersigned counsel and it should be of greater concern to the residents of this city/ The connection between Mrs. Mosby and Mr. Murphy is undeniable and the conflict it creates is detrimental in the pursuit of justice.

5 May, 2015

Files to see knife

Files Suit

Lawyers for Nero file a motion in Baltimore District Court, asking the police department and prosecutor to produce the knife that was the reason for Gray’s arrest. Mosby, when charging Nero, said that Gray’s knife was legal under Maryland law, meaning Nero had arrested Gray illegally. If the knife is deemed to be an illegal knife then Nero’s charges of second-degree assault, misconduct in office and false imprisonment will fail, as Gray’s arrest would have been justified.

2008

Lead paint lawsuit

Files Suit

Gray and his siblings file a lead-poisoning lawsuit against the property owner of the house they lived in on North Carey Street from 1992-1997. Gray lived in the front room with his mother. Court records show that in May of 1990, when the family was living in a home on Fulton Avenue in West Baltimore, Gray’s blood contained more than 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood — double the level at which the Center for Disease Control urges additional testing. Three months later, his blood had nearly 30 micrograms. In June 1991, when Gray was 22 months old, his blood carried 37 micrograms. It is believed that anything higher than five micrograms can cripple a child’s cognitive development. From Gray’s deposition:

There was a big hole when you go up the steps. There was a couple of walls that wasn’t painted all the way, peeled. . . . And like the windows, paint was peeling off the windows.

The suit results in an undisclosed settlement in 2010.

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